Funds

Johnson County, Kansas, leaders approve funds to help child care providers

The Johnson County, Kansas, Board of County Commissioners approved $2 million to help offset the cost of child care centers.A recent survey showed Johnson County families spend 18% of their income on child care and that’s if they can find it.Emily Barnes works 10 hours a day, five days a week as an in-home childcare provider for a lot of little ones, and even then, she said it is hard to make ends meet. Barnes said that as an industry her profession is not paid well.”We have to talk about money and it’s not fun, and it’s really, really hard. But parents cannot pay more, providers cannot earn less. We can’t,” Barnes said.The Johnson County Board of County Commissioners took steps to change that on Monday, setting aside $2 million to help child care centers such as Barnes’ pay for licensing, business development, and training. The county is using federal COVID-19 funding for the program.”Since 2010, our license fees have gone up 600%, our training requirements are over three times what they were,” said Tiffany Mannes, an in-home child care provider.Providing funding for training, licensing, and other business costs.”Now, and 18 years is the first time I’ve gotten any sort of grants or funding, so it’s incredible to receive that,” Mannes said.Child care professionals say they don’t do it for the money but they do need money.”It’s really hard to balance making sure our parents can afford childcare and making sure we can put food on our table and take care of our families,” Mannes said.The Kansas City Chamber of Commerce said that almost 40% of childcare centers closed in the metro during COVID-19.More information:Childcare Providers Coalition of Kansas

The Johnson County, Kansas, Board of County Commissioners approved $2 million to help offset the cost of child care centers.

A recent survey showed Johnson County families spend 18% of their income on child care and that’s if they can find it.

Emily Barnes works 10 hours a day, five days a week as an in-home childcare provider for a lot of little ones, and even then, she said it is hard to make ends meet. Barnes said that as an industry her profession is not paid well.

“We have to talk about money and it’s not fun, and it’s really, really hard. But parents cannot pay more, providers cannot earn less. We can’t,” Barnes said.

The Johnson County Board of County Commissioners took steps to change that on Monday, setting aside $2 million to help child care centers such as Barnes’ pay for licensing, business development, and training. The county is using federal COVID-19 funding for the program.

“Since 2010, our license fees have gone up 600%, our training requirements are over three times what they were,” said Tiffany Mannes, an in-home child care provider.

Providing funding for training, licensing, and other business costs.

“Now, and 18 years is the first time I’ve gotten any sort of grants or funding, so it’s incredible to receive that,” Mannes said.

Child care professionals say they don’t do it for the money but they do need money.

“It’s really hard to balance making sure our parents can afford childcare and making sure we can put food on our table and take care of our families,” Mannes said.

The Kansas City Chamber of Commerce said that almost 40% of childcare centers closed in the metro during COVID-19.

More information:

Childcare Providers Coalition of Kansas

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